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February 2019

Smokehouse/Chophouse Style Challenge: Reviewing KFC's Smoky Mountain BBQ Chicken Tenders

By Mike Thayer

KFC Smoky Mountain BBQ
KFC Promo Pic

I recently wrote about what to look forward to in 2019 from fast food.  Trending, are smokehouse/steakhouse style burgers and sandwiches and the meat of the year is predicted to be brisket.

Consumers are clamoring for something more, creations beyond the ordinary realm of classic burger and sandwich flavors.  People want smokey, they desire more than just ketchup and mustard, folks are calling for cheeses with deeper flavors and buns with a little more tease than run-of-the-mill sesame seeds.  And it's no different when it comes to other meat on bread options, a.k.a., pizza, consumers are looking for more, something beyond the traditional flavors.

20190221_121131Today for lunch I opted for 'other,' traveling to KFC and ordering their Smoky Mountain BBQ basket, going with the chicken tenders option.

Here's the description from the website:  Our Smoky Mountain BBQ brings the sweet, smoky flavors of Southern BBQ to Kentucky! Available in tenders, Chicken Littles™, and Extra Crispy™ chicken, it’s crispy on the outside, tender on the inside, and delicious on every side. Try it in a Smoky Mountain BBQ basket today with your choice of Extra Crispy™ chicken or Extra Crispy™ tenders, mashed potatoes, biscuit, and pickles!

My to-go meal cost me $6.98 for three tenders, a biscuit, pickles, mashed potatoes and gravy along with a medium drink.  I was intrigued by this menu item because the sauce is oil-based, crafted that way to maintain the crispiness of the chicken.  A traditional BBQ sauce would result in soggy breading and who wants soggy fried chicken, right?

20190221_121555Making a little sandwich with one of the tenders, the pickles and the biscuit, I enjoyed all the flavors that were brought together.  The chicken was indeed crispy and the sauce was sweet and smoky as advertised.  The pickle provided the tart you want to offset the sweet and what can you say about the biscuits that hasn't already been said, KFC makes some of the best biscuits in fast food.  Dressing that biscuit with a packet of that KFC butter before slapping it all together, I have to say it was a pretty tasty little sandwich.  When I got to the tenders by themselves though - particularly the one sitting entirely flat on the bottom of the tray - that sauce, without the marriage with the bun and pickles was now too sweet and the grainy-texture of that oil-based sauce became quite noticeable.  It wasn't off-putting enough to put the tenders down, but the grittiness of it did put a bit of a downer on the remainder of the meal.

All-in-all, the flavors are there, but the chicken and sauce definitely needed the bread and pickles to make it more enjoyable and the grainy texture of KFC's "Smoky Mountain BBQ" sauce takes the meal out of the repeat buy column.  I give KFC's offering 3 out of 5 Bachelor on the Cheap stars, but only because I don't do half stars.    The price was reasonable, but unless the Colonel can smooth over that sauce, I'd rather get something else off the menu.

3 stars

$pend Wisely My Friends.....

 


Coffee Challenge: A review of Folger's Hazelnut

By Mike Thayer

Like so many working stiffs, I've GOT to have my coffee in the morning to get jump started. Traditionally, I'm a Folgers Classic Roast kind of guy and I doctor my coffee with some hazelnut flavored creamer.  No, I'm NOT a coffee snob.  I don't do the whole beans and a coffee grinder thing, screw that, buying ground coffee works just fine for me.

But in trying to eliminate some sugars from my diet, I've dropped the flavored creamer from my morning routine, switching to real, heavy cream. The various flavored brands of coffee creamer range 5-10 grams of sugar per serving, heavy cream weighs in at 0.1 grams.  But in making that change, my coffee was far less enjoyable. I missed the hazelnut!

So during my next visit to the grocery store, I picked up some hazelnut coffee.  On that trip, I picked up a bag of Dunkin' Donuts hazelnut and you can read that review here.  The Dunkin' was a bit of a disappointment, it left me wondering if there wasn't something better out there in a hazelnut grind.  Hence, this coffee challenge.

20190221_074742Today, I'm reviewing Folger's version of a hazelnut grind.

Here's the description of the coffee from the container:  Flavorful and smooth, with a distinctive blend of hazelnut flavor.

Folger's packages their coffee in a canister, rather than a bag.  I like that, it's easier to get into and close back up and you can reuse the container.  I actually like to buy a big canister of coffee (30.5 ounces) which I keep in the pantry, but I keep a smaller canister (11.5 ounces) on the counter, with my trusty coffee scoop tucked inside by the coffee pot, at the ready.  I refill it from the bigger canister as needed.

With Folger's Classic Roast being my traditional go-to coffee, I expected the same reliability in flavor from the hazelnut version. It didn't disappoint.  The hazelnut is obvious, present in both the aroma and flavor.  The grind makes a good cup of coffee.  The directions call for one tablespoon of coffee for every six ounces of water and that's one thing I've always liked about Folger's, they're not bashful with their grind, a scoop is robust and doesn't brew up weak like Dunkin' Donuts hazelnut did.  I like the Folgers Hazelnut, but unlike Seattle's Best, the Folger's doesn't quite deliver a taste that's on par to how I used to enjoy my coffee (a classic, regular roast with hazelnut flavored creamer), I had to add a 1/2 packet of Stevia to sweeten things up a bit. 

The 11.5 ounce canister of coffee cost me $5.99 which puts it smack dab in the middle in pricing for the coffees I've sampled so far.  Folger's Hazelnut gets 4 out of 5 stars, it's a repeat buy, but in a Plan 'B' kind of way. 

4 stars

Stay tuned for more sampling of hazelnut coffees from the various brands available as part of the Bachelor on the Cheap Coffee Challenge!

$pend Wisely My Friends.....


BBQ Sauce Challenge: Sweet Baby Ray's vs. KC Masterpiece

By Mike Thayer

What is the most popular thing to add to meats cooked outdoors?

BBQ Sauces

20190217_182745It’s true, the most popular thing to add to the plethora of meats cooked outdoors is BBQ sauce. If you had guessed ketchup, believe it or not, you would be wrong.

The person who invented BBQ sauce is unknown, but whoever he was, he was a genius! References to the sauce started appearing in 17th century English and French literature about the formation of the American colonies. The rest is history and boy has BBQ sauce been kicked up a notch with all kinds of flavors and varieties created over the last 400+ years!

A traditional flavoring for pork, beef and chicken, sauce can range from watery to thick, from being heavy on the vinegar to being loaded with spice. Ranging in flavor from sugary to savory, to HOT!, heck, there’s even mustard and mayonnaise based BBQ sauces. It’s a regional thing, there’s Carolina BBQ; Tennessee whiskey BBQ; Texas BBQ; and the favorite of many, Kansas City Style BBQ.

What is your favorite, do you like sweet, tangy, KC style, Carolina style?  Have you tried enough variety to know?

In the coming weeks, I'm going to be sampling it all, making comparisons and letting you know what I think the cream of the crop is. Will it be KC Masterpiece? Sweet Baby Ray's? Stubbs? Something else?

20190217_184322First upKC Masterpiece vs. Sweet Baby Ray's

Test Subject:  My famous "Idaho Burger" served on a toasted onion roll

KC Masterpiece:  Created in 1977 and originally called K.C. Soul Style Barbecue Sauce, it was renamed KC Masterpiece in 1978 and really took off in sales, becoming a go-to sauce for a lot of folks.  This is a Kansas City BBQ style sauce which is perhaps the most popular off-the-shelf style found in most grocery stores.   That this particular sauce has been around so long, in addition to some saavy marketing, is what has aided in its popularity.  In full disclosure it was the sauce of choice in my house growing up as a kid.  When I ventured out on my own, in the military and into BBQ on the weekends with my buddies, KC Masterpiece was the base for a sauce we used on a plethora of meats, doctored with some bourbon, onion, Louisiana Hot Sauce and a few other ingredients.  But I digress.... 

How is KC Masterpiece?   Here's the description from the bottle:   KC Masterpiece BBQ Sauce is kettle cooked to produce rich layers of sweet, smoky flavor.  This award-winning sauce has the perfect blend of tomato, onion, molasses and spices to please your whole family. KC Masterpiece is now owned by the Kingsford charcoal division of The HV Food Products Company, formally known known as Hidden Valley Ranch Food Products, Inc.

This sauce is almost the literal definition for a KC BBQ style sauce, it's thick, big on the tomato and heavy on molasses, so heavy in fact, the sweet from the molasses is a bit overpowering.   That's probably why I liked it so much as a kid, because of the sweetness of it.   As is typical of KC BBQ style sauces, it really doesn’t penetrate the meat and is more like a frosting than a marinade or something you would want to mop that beautiful cut of meat with. It glazes real nice though when put on the meat about 10 minutes before pulling off the grill.  But when it comes down to it, this sauce by itself is too sweet, it needs to be doctored before putting it on anything.  Tastes change going from childhood to adulthood and when it's all said and done, KC 2 starsMasterpiece is what I would politely call an introductory BBQ sauce.  I give KC Masterpiece just 2 out of 5 Bachelor on the Cheap stars.  It's too sweet, not enough spice or vinegar twang.

Sweet Baby Ray's:  There's no ingredient teaser description on the bottle, just a blurb about the sauce beating out 700 other competitors in a riboff leading to the creation of the company.    Enough said, the sauce lives up to the award hype.   Around since 1985, Sweet Baby Ray's is a very good all-around sauce, balanced in sweet, spice and twang.  No doctoring of the sauce is required.  When I cut my Idaho Burger in half and topped each half with sauce, one half with the KC Masterpiece, the other with Sweet Baby Ray's....  Guess which burger half I finished and which half went in the fridge for later?  Yep, the Sweet Baby Ray's half was the half I enjoyed far more.  I took a bite of the KC Masterpiece half first, then took a bite of the Sweet Baby Ray's half and couldn't put it 4 starsdown.  Sweet Baby Ray's gets 4 out of 5 Bachelor on the Cheap stars.  It's an off-the-shelf sauce that deserves a place in your pantry or fridge.

Both brands cost under $3 per bottle, but the KC Masterpiece weighed in at 28 ounces and the Sweet Baby Ray's was 40 ounces.  So not only does Sweet Baby Ray's taste much better, you get more sauce for the buck!  And it's all about the sauce in this challenge!

Stay tuned for more sauce tastings!

$pend Wisely My Friends.....


Coming Soon: A BBQ Sauce Challenge

By Mike Thayer

What is the most popular thing to add to meats cooked outdoors?

BBQ Sauces

20190217_182745It’s true, the most popular thing to add to the plethora of meats cooked outdoors is BBQ sauce. If you had guessed ketchup, believe it or not, you would be wrong.

The person who invented BBQ sauce is unknown, but whoever he was, he was a genius! References to the sauce started appearing in 17th century English and French literature about the formation of the American colonies. The rest is history and boy has BBQ sauce been kicked up a notch with all kinds of flavors and varieties created over the last 400+ years!

A traditional flavoring for pork, beef and chicken, sauce can range from watery to thick, from being heavy on the vinegar to being loaded with spice. Ranging in flavor from sugary to savory, to HOT!, heck, there’s even mustard and mayonnaise based BBQ sauces. It’s a regional thing, there’s Carolina BBQ; Tennessee whiskey BBQ; Texas BBQ; and the favorite of many, Kansas City Style BBQ.

Kansas City BBQ Style: This is a thick, rich tomato based sauce that’s got some spice but is heavier on the sweet. Tomato, brown sugar and vinegar are the base ingredients. It really doesn’t penetrate the meat and is more like a frosting than a marinade. It glazes real nice though when put on the meat about 10 minutes before pulling off the grill, a beautiful finish. This is the most popular style of BBQ sauce in the U.S. and what you see the most of in the bottled varieties on the grocery store shelf. Be careful with the store bought stuff though! The high sugar content of the ‘ready’ varieties tend to burn real quick so keep an eye on your dinner.

Texas BBQ Style: This has more kick than Kansas City style. It has less tomato, less sugar and a lot more spice such as cumin, black pepper, chili pepper and even chili powder. Meat drippings and hot sauce - Tabasco - are always part of this style and fresh veggies like green bell pepper and onion are often added.

East Carolina Mop: This simple but tasty sauce was pioneered by the African slaves of Scottish settlers in the region. It’s a straight forward combination of hot pepper flakes, ground black pepper and vinegar. The reason it’s called a mop is because this thin concoction is literally mopped - basted - on the meat throughout the cooking process, the flavor really penetrates! With little if any sugar and no tomato in this style, East Carolina Mop is a sharp contrast to other sauces.

Western Carolina Dip: From the hilly areas of North Carolina, most American sauces can trace their roots to this one. The recipe usually consists of a base of black pepper blended with tomato paste or tomato sauce, or ketchup, with vinegar added to balance it out. Like the East Carolina Mop, this is a thin sauce that is mopped on the meat throughout the cooking process.

South Carolina Mustard Style: This is a whole new BBQ sauce experience. Early German settlers developed this one and while good on chicken, it’s tailor made for pork. A little thicker than its Carolina cousin sauces, a simple recipe consists of mustard, vinegar, spices and a little sugar. It’s fantastic on a pulled pork sandwich topped with coleslaw!

Tennessee Whiskey Style: Made famous by the Jack Daniel’s World Championship Barbecue Invitational, this method of flavoring meats is also referred to as ‘Memphis Style’ has become so popular it now deserves its own category. This combination of vinegar, whiskey, molasses, spices, and Worcestershire sauce gives BBQ a whole new flavor profile.

There are all kinds of variations and morphing of styles out there, there are probably all kinds of choices available at your favorite grocery store.

In the coming weeks, I'm going to be sampling it all, making comparisons and letting you know what I think the cream of the crop is.  Will it be KC Masterpiece?  Sweet Baby Ray's?  Stubbs?  Something else?

Stay tuned.....  First up to be sampled, two of the most popular out there, Sweet Baby Ray's vs. KC Masterpiece.

$pend Wisely My Friends.....

 


Coffee Review: Seattle's Best Hazelnut

By Mike Thayer

Like so many working stiffs, I've GOT to have my coffee in the morning to get jump started. Traditionally, I'm a Folgers Classic Roast kind of guy and I doctor my coffee with some hazelnut flavored creamer.  No, I'm NOT a coffee snob.  I don't do the whole beans and a coffee grinder thing, screw that, buying ground coffee works just fine for me.

But in trying to eliminate some sugars from my diet, I've dropped the flavored creamer from my morning routine, switching to real, heavy cream. The various flavored brands of coffee creamer range 5-10 grams of sugar per serving, heavy cream weighs in at 0.1 grams.  But in making that change, my coffee was far less enjoyable. I missed the hazelnut!

So during my next visit to the grocery store, I picked up some hazelnut coffee.  On that trip, I picked up a bag of Dunkin' Donuts hazelnut and you can read that review here

20190218_064652-1Today, I'm reviewing Seattle's Best version of a hazelnut grind.

Here's the description of the coffee from the bag:  Ah...the sweetly aromatic, nutty notes of roasted hazelnuts (without sugar, mind you) combined with a perfectly balanced blend of premium coffee beans make for a delicious, rewarding taste.

Seattle's Best is a subsidiary of Starbuck's, so the expectation for this coffee was high going in and the grind did not disappoint.  This is good coffee, a better coffee than the Dunkin' version, which brewed up weak.  I prepared the coffee just like I've always done my Folger's Classic Roast, as I did the Dunkin' (first pot), traditionally portioned with my trusty coffee scoop.  The package calls for a rounded tablespoon per six ounces of water and that is spot on, brewing to the strength I like.  The grind was very aromatic in the package, everybody likes to take a deep inhale of coffee from a freshly opened package right?  And while brewing you get a nice aromatic whiff permeating through the house.  The taste delivers and is on par to how I used to enjoy my coffee, a classic, regular roast with hazelnut flavored creamer.

The 12 ounce bag of coffee cost me just $4.99 which makes it Bachelor on the Cheap wallet friendly and it's a very enjoyable coffee.  Seattle's Best Hazelnut gets 5 out of 5 Bachelor on the Cheap stars.  It's definitely a repeat buy!

5 stars

Stay tuned for more sampling of hazelnut coffees from the various brands available as part of the Bachelor on the Cheap Coffee Challenge!

$pend Wisely My Friends.....

 

 


Coffee Challenge: Who makes the best hazelnut coffee?

By Mike Thayer

Cup of coffeeLike so many working stiffs, I've GOT to have my coffee in the morning to get jump started. Traditionally, I'm a Folgers Classic Roast kind of guy and I doctor my coffee with some hazelnut flavored creamer.  So no, I'm NOT a coffee snob.  I don't do the whole beans and a coffee grinder thing, screw that, buying ground coffee works just fine for me.

But in trying to eliminate some sugars from my diet, I've dropped the flavored creamer from my morning routine, switching to real, heavy cream. The various flavored brands of coffee creamer range 5-10 grams of sugar per serving, heavy cream weighs in at 0.1 grams.  But in making that change, my coffee was far less enjoyable. I missed the hazelnut! So during my next visit to the grocery store, I picked up some hazelnut coffee.  On that trip, I picked up a bag of Dunkin' Donuts hazelnut and you can read that review here.  To sum, it was OK, but I enjoyed the way I used to have my coffee, better.  A classic roast + hazelnut coffee creamer is better than the Dunkin' Donuts version of a hazelnut coffee doctored with some simple, heavy cream.  It left me wondering if there wasn't something better out there in a hazelnut grind.  Would such a coffee be Bachelor on the Cheap wallet friendly, or will I have to settle for something less-than-stellar, something just not as good as how I used to enjoy my cup of Joe? 

Reviewed so far in the Bachelor on the Cheap Coffee Challenge:

Dunkin'

Seattle's Best

Folger's

Great Value

Eight O'Clock

$pend Wisely My Friends.....

 


Shamrock Shake Season at McDonald’s is Here

Shamrock ShakeThe one, the only, the original Shamrock Shake is back. The legendary treat returns now for a limited time at participating U.S. restaurants. It’s made with our creamy, dreamy vanilla soft serve blended with Shamrock Shake syrup and topped with delicious whipped topping. The Shamrock Shake is a seasonal treat many customers wait for all year-long - in fact, customers have been loving the craveable and delicious treat for nearly 50 years. It first debuted on menus in 1970. Find the limited-time Shamrock Shake at a participating McDonald’s near you with the Shamrock Shake® Finder in our App.


Food Review: Kellogg's Special K Crustless Quiche

By Mike Thayer

I'm a sucker for a sausage, egg and cheese biscuit, wrap or croissant of some sort for breakfast, but I'm open to other options and a little variety.

Interested in something a little different for my morning meal while shopping at Costco the other day I came across Kellogg's Special K Crustless Quiche, selecting the sausage, quinoa, peppers, mozzarella & asiago flavor.  Sounds pretty good right?

20190216_075557-1Here's the description from the company website:  Bring out the morning person inside of you with Kellogg’s Special K Sausage, Pepper & Cheese Quiches filled with yummy sausage, chopped peppers, mozzarella and asiago—making mornings your new favorite.

No, no it won't be a new favorite.  These things are NOT a repeat buy.  The cliche' line of, "Real men don't eat quiche"....  This is why.

You get the pepper notes right away, there's a slight hint of sausage and the cheese is notable, but overall this little quiche is less-than-satisfying.  They are just 170 calories each and so two are needed to fill you up for breakfast, but the overall flavor and texture of these things just falls flat.  To sum, I'm not looking forward to breakfast tomorrow, but regrettably, this is what's on the menu until I finish the box.   

20190216_080336I paid $11.99 for an eight count box at Costco, that's about $1.50 each.  Needing two to make a meal of it, they are small, over-priced and fail to deliver breakfast enjoyment.  In staying with the healthier breakfast mindset, I'd much rather take pleasure in a Jimmie Dean Egg'wich

Kellogg's Special K Crustless Quiche with sausage, quinoa, peppers, mozzarella & asiago gets just 2 out of 5 Bachelor on the Cheap stars.  No thanks Kellogg's, and I'm not interested in the other flavors either.

2 stars


Coffee Review: Dunkin' Donuts Hazelnut

By Mike Thayer

Like so many working stiffs, I've GOT to have my coffee in the morning to get jump started.  Traditionally, I'm a Folgers Classic Roast kind of guy and I doctor my coffee with some hazelnut flavored creamer.  But in trying to eliminate some sugars from my diet, I've dropped the flavored creamer from my morning routine, switching to real, heavy cream.  The various flavored brands of coffee creamer range 5-10 grams of sugar per serving, heavy cream weighs in at 0.1 grams.

20190214_151341But in making that change, my coffee was far less enjoyable.  I missed the hazelnut!  So during my next visit to the grocery store, I picked up some hazelnut coffee.  The neighborhood store I was at didn't have a Folger's offering, so I went with the Dunkin' Donuts® version.  I've never had Dunkin' Donuts® home brewed coffee before, I like the restaurant java, so I was looking forward to brewing my own.

Here's the description of the coffee on the bag:  The rich, smooth taste of Dunkin' Donuts® Original Blend with the flavors and aromas of sweet roasted hazelnuts. 

That's a nice description, but will that hazelnut flavor and aroma live up to the marketing hype? 

The coffee delivers on the nutty flavor I was craving and it's a smooth taste, but I will say the coffee as prepared per the package instructions brews up weak.  The instructions recommend 1-1/2 tablespoons per 6 ounces of water, I recommend two.  Out of habit, I prepared my first pot of Dunkin' measured out just as I would my Classic Roast Folger's with my trusty coffee scoop and filling the coffee pot with cold water up to the six cup mark.....  The Dunkin' came out weak.  That first pot was less-than-stellar, but the next morning I made the scoop adjustment and it was much better, delivering that more robust cup of Joe I was looking for!  It's good to have found the right scoop amount for maximum flavor, but I'm going to go through this 12 ounces of coffee faster than I would 12 ounces of Folgers.

I paid $6.99 for a 12 ounce package of ground coffee.  It's a bit more expensive than the Folger's or Eight O'Clock equivalent, but it's cheaper than say Gevalia or Starbucks. 

Dunkin' Donuts Hazelnut coffee gets 3 out of 5 Bachelor on the Cheap stars.  The price is towards the higher end of what you see on the grocery store shelves.  The flavor is there when adding to the recommended measurement, but it doesn't compare well to the original blend and hazelnut shot you get in a Dunkin' restaurant.  The way I used to drink my coffee is better as well.  Plus, I'll go through this weak grind of Dunkin' faster than I would my trusted Folgers...  It's not a repeat buy, I'd rather travel a little farther down the road to where I do my regular grocery shopping and buy Folgers Hazelnut.

3 stars

$pend Wisely My Friends.....


Wive's Tales & Home Remedies - How Effective Are They?

By Mike Thayer

AppleDoes an apple a day really keep the doctor away?  Does mixing rubbing alcohol and water to make a de-icer really work? 

Here are a few that I know first hand to be tried and true.  Let's start off with a classic, eating those apples....

Wives Tale: An apple a day keeps the doctor away.  There have been a number of studies done on this and apples do indeed have many health benefits, from being heart healthy to improving your immune system.  I don't know about you, but I'd rather eat an apple than visit the doctor.

And with apples in mind....

Home Remedy: After a night of hard drinking, try easing your hangover pain with a shot of apple cider vinegar.  Alcohol messes with your blood sugar and your stomach.  The apple cider vinegar helps to offset what the alcohol messed up, getting your blood sugar back in balance and soothing your stomach.  If you don't want to drink it straight, dilute it with some water.  Of course, we all know that the only true cure for a hangover, is to not over-do the adult beverages in the first place... 

Wives TaleCount sheep to fall asleep.  No, you don't have to actually count sheep, but the act of counting something and the use of mental imagery can certainly assist in getting you to fall asleep faster.  It works because it distracts you from thinking of stressful or worrisome thoughts. 

Home Remedy:  Using baking soda and vinegar to unclog drains does indeed work.  So much more cost effective than buying a bottle of Drano or Liquid Plumber, it works just as well and you're not pouring a bunch of toxic chemicals down the pipe.  If you've got a slow drain, unclog it using the following steps:

  • Pour a pot of hot water down the drain, this helps loosen up that sludge or clog buildup.
  • Just before all the hot water is completely drained away, put a heaping 1/2 cup of baking soda down the drain.  You want to get that stuff into the pipe, not just sitting on top of the drain and that remaining very hot water helps to do that. 
  • Once all the baking soda gets below the drain, pour in 1 cup vinegar followed immediately by 1 cup of very hot water down that drain. 
  • Once the sink is completely drained, flush the drain with another pot of boiling water.  You may have to repeat this whole process again for tougher clogs.

Wives Tale: When you have a cold, eat chicken soup.  No, chicken soup won't help cure your cold, it's going to run its course, but the chicken soup  does actually help relieve the symptoms of your cold.  Studies show that chicken soup helps clear nasal congestion, breaks up mucus so you can cough it up better and the soup classic also has an anti-inflammatory effect that can help ease other cold symptoms like a sore throat. 

Home Remedy:  If you're feeling nauseous, don't reach for the stomach medicine, eat some ginger or drink some ginger tea instead!  Studies show ginger to be very effective at relieving nausea and even preventing vomiting.  And if eating ginger or whipping something up with ginger in it doesn't appeal to you, there are a lot of ginger supplements on the market today.

Wives Tale: Use oats to help sooth bug bites.  Yes, it really works!  Just mix oatmeal with enough water to create a thick paste and slather it on those mosquito bites.  It will reduce the inflammation and more importantly, the itch - it's the antioxidants in the oats that does it.  If you don't want to walk around with that concoction on your arm (or elsewhere on the bod), go to the drugstore and get a moisturizer or skin lotion that lists oatmeal as a main ingredient. 

Home Remedy:  Have a nagging cough?  Grab the honey, which studies have shown to be just as effective as any of those expensive off-the-shelf cough suppressants.   Honey tastes better and what it does is coat your throat and sooth irritation, just like dextromethorphan  - the main ingredient in that off-the-shelf stuff - is designed to do.  

Wives Tale: Fish is brain food.  Stock up on salmon, mackerel, herring, sardines, cod and other kinds of fish rich in omega 3- and omega-6 essential fatty acids because science does show that eating fish aids in brain growth and development.  In fact, a  lot of research of these omegas has gone into the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.  Omegas also have anti-inflammatory properties that  help to reduce joint stiffness and prevent heart disease. 

Home RemedyRubbing alcohol and water makes a de-icer. This isn't quite as quick as the commercial stuff, but it does indeed work and it's A LOT cheaper!

  • 2 parts rubbing alcohol
  • 1 part water

Pour the alcohol and water into a spray bottle. Spray on the windshield or other surface and let it work for about 1-5 minutes (depending on how thick the ice is).  A second application may be necessary.  Scraping ice off the windshield or opening up the lock on the door becomes easy peasy.

I can attest to all the effectiveness of all these wives tales and home remedies.  I've tried them because they're Bachelor on the Cheap wallet friendly and I use them because they work.

$pend Wisely My Friends.....