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Shopping for truck tires with a budget in mind

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

When I bought my 1992 Ford F-150 three years ago, she had 112,000 miles on her and about a half life left on a set of Goodyear Wrangler tires, which are rated as a 50k tire. 

Pushing 136,000 miles now, 'ol Nellie needs a new pair (set) of shoes!

I've been impressed by the ride and treadwear of the Goodyear Wrangler.  It's considered to be a tire that falls into the 'budget' category of tires, and while a new set of Wranglers was definitely on my shopping list, I was open to other budget-friendly tires without sacrificing quality.

The shopping criteria was $90 - $125 per tire, all terrain, rated for at least 50,000 miles.  Sure, I could get tires cheaper than $90 each, but they would be rated under 50k....  For those of you that live in Valley Center, that means a properly maintained 50k rated tire is expected to last about 50,000 miles.  Quality truck tires start at $90 and up.  I'm budget-minded, not cheap. 

Now 'ol Nellie is a 2WD, she drives a lot of city miles, a fair amount of highway miles, a few country miles, hauls a load once in awhile and needs to navigate roads for all conditions, wet, dry, muddy, slushy, snowy.

Here's the homework/evaluation info, starting with what I'm already familiar with first:

Goodyear WranglerGoodyear Wrangler:  All Terrain, 50K, $96 per tire - Cost for 4 prior to install:  $384.  As stated earlier, I like how they ride, I've been impressed by the tread wear and I'm not bothered by any tread noise.  Wranglers have gotten me through all kinds of weather and on all kinds of road surfaces.

Firestone DestinationFirestone Destination:  All Terrain, 50K, $116 per tire - Cost for 4 prior to install:  $464.  I'd be shelling out another $80 for a set of four of these tires vs. the Wrangler, that's almost another tire in price!  And for the same mileage rating of 50k?  No thanks.  I dismissed this tire on price alone, outright.  The tread pattern, the ride, the road noise, all became irrelevant, immediately.

BF GoodrichBF Goodrich Advantage TA:  All Terrain, 65K, $114 per tire - Cost for 4 prior to install:  $456.  This tire isn't quite as expensive as Firestone's and it has a better mileage rating.  But is another 15,000 miles worth the extra $72?  Will I even still be driving 'ol Nellie at that point?  Shhhhhh, don't tell her I said that!  And is this tread pattern aggressive enough for all terrain needs?  If this tire can't throw a little mud, I have no use for it.

Cooper DiscovererCooper Discoverer:  All Terrain, 55K, $123 per tire - Cost for 4 prior to install:  $492.  This is the most expensive tire of those evaluated.  I would be paying out $108 more for a set of four of these tires vs. the Goodyear Wrangler...  Not only is the price of a tire far higher, but it's for just 5k more in a tire rating.  No thanks, and like the BF Goodrich tire, I don't see this tread pattern as being aggressive enough for all terrain.

General GrabberGeneral Grabber:  All Terrain, 60k, $99 per tire - Cost for 4 prior to install:  $396.  The price is attractive, so is the tread pattern and for just $3 more per tire vs. the Wrangler I could get another 10,000 miles in tread wear....  But the online reviews steered (get it, 'steered'?) me away from buying this tire.

The online reviews for all the tires researched were all over the map, from ratings of 1 to 5, a 5 being the best.  In reading some of those low ratings however, I have to question the knowledge of the buyers, saying things like the tread didn't last long, already gone after 11,000 miles.... That's horse manure!  Hey Sherlock, perhaps you need an alignment and try checking your tire pressure once in awhile!  Tire ratings for mileage are pretty accurate folks, something you can count on - IF you take care of your tires! 

I take caution in putting too much stock into online reviews - they include bad ratings from stupid people who don't know what an alignment is, for example - but overall, they do provide a gauge of sorts in prepping for a purchase and a number of VALID negative reviews on a specific product can raise some red flags.  A higher average rating is a good thing but be sure to look at the number of reviews.  Volume matters, the more, the better.  Don't take a high average rating with only 12 reviews too seriously.  Here's how the online rating averages stack up from a variety of review sources to compile at least 100 reviews (1=sucks, 5=great):

  • Goodyear Wrangler: 4.9
  • Firestone Destination: 4.8
  • Cooper Discoverer: 4.6
  • BF Goodrich Advantage TA: 4.2
  • General Tire Grabber: 3.7

Why was the General Tire Grabber so low in the online reviews you ask?  For the most part, the negative reviews were about the rough ride and tread noise.

So which tire did I decide on?

The Goodyear Wrangler.  The price was right, the reviews were good, confirming what I already knew about Wranglers.

'ol Nellie has a new pair (set) of shoes and she looks PURDY!

Related:  https://www.tirerack.com/tires/reviews/MenuServlet?search=surveyComments

Related:  https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/tires.htm

Related:  https://www.1010tires.com/Tires/Reviews/Light+Trucks+and+SUVs 

Spend Wisely My Friends.....

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